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Home Health Improve Your Structural Health by Practicing Agility Training

Improve Your Structural Health by Practicing Agility Training

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Many people in the fitness industry are searching for information to improve their structural health and alleviate injuries. Dealing with complicated matters like injury prevention and treatment can be simplified by practicing regular customized athletic training. This includes strength and conditioning, as well as modified speed, agility, and power work for non-athletes or those not competing.

The Benefits of Agility Training for Short and Long-Term Structural Health

Agility training, which focuses on multi-directional movement, is crucial for preventing and treating injuries because it adheres to “The Law of Specificity” in training science. By training in a way that simulates the movements that could cause injury, you prepare your body to handle the workload or stress when it arises in your specific environment. It is widely known that most injuries, especially in athletics, occur during rotational motion when the body is decelerating. Agility exercises align with this injury criteria, making them essential for injury prevention. However, it is important to address the catch-22 situation that arises with agility training. While it may seem counterintuitive to engage in an activity that could potentially cause injury, it is also the primary means of movement training to prevent injury. So, how do you incorporate agility training into your program? Here are some suggestions:

Tips for Agile Programming:

  1. Always perform a proper warm-up and preparation system before attempting any agility or change of direction exercises.
  2. Consider including total body strength training in your routine, either before or in conjunction with agility training, to improve performance and prevent injury. Strength training primes coordination levels in the muscles and nervous system, enhances tissue density, and helps with proper absorption and loading of muscle tissue during agility work.
  3. Start with basic agility drills that are less technical, slower, and easier to perform if you’re unsure or uncomfortable with more advanced progressions.
  4. Limit agility training to a maximum of three times per week, including sport-specific training, to allow for proper recovery, motor learning, and adaptation. Keep in mind that low volumes of speed and agility work are more effective in fostering development, except for elite performers during specific training phases.

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